Author’s and publisher’s are finding it easier to get noticed thanks to the Internet. In fact many online services allow free publishing (such as createspace.com) and many authors have their books available online for free (such as The Online Book Page). Many say they employ these tactics for greater publicity. Another reason that the internet has become such a useful tool for literature and print media is because money talks- online literature, magazines, newspapers, etc., are less expensive for both the consumer and the producer.

A good example in the literary realm is the release of Amazon’s revolutionary reading device: Kindle.If you haven’t heard about this device, it’s simply an iPod for books. Owners can download full books onto this device (up to about 200 books) and take read them anywhere. And thanks to its internet capability, you don’t need a computer to buy the kindle editions of books. The device also has a nice easy reading display, unlike many laptops. iPods do have audio books and similar devices allow you to download books onto them, but limited space and poor displays makes the Kindle more favorable.

Many, including Editorial Campana’s Weblog have discussed if the Kindle is worth it or not. Many people still argue that traditional books is what they prefer. So it would seem that for now, books are safe from the digital revolution. Or to put it in better terms, they are endangered but not extinct.

So what about other print media, such as magazines and newspapers.We still love to go to the mail book and get our new editions, many still enjoy grabbing their cup of coffee and a newspaper, and when it comes to traveling, it’s always fun to travel with plenty of reading material. But is all this about to change. According to a recent article from (and yes its off the Internet) The New York times, physical magazines and newspapers may soon become a thing of the past.  In fact, some magazines that were available in both forms have opted out of traditional print and are now only published via digital format.

“Just last week, The Capital Times, a 90-year-old daily newspaper in Madison, Wis., ended its print version and began publishing only online.”

With the way the economy is a the moment, cheaper is better and it helps to reach a greater audience. The numbers seem to be doing the talking. Many companies have noted that they have seem more readers from their online publications. As well money talks- companies have seen higher (even just slightly) profits from online publications. Due to this, when it comes to the future, many companies are adopting what is known as an “online first” approach to business. While in the past, companies split their efforts between online and traditional publications, lately, the former is getting more attention and becoming more of the norm.

What does this all mean? Although we can still go to the store and buy our books, magazines, newspapers, etc., will we one day go to a computer and download digital versions that we will carry like we once did with our physical literature? How will this affect Kindle’s popularity and the overall world of literature?

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