Tag Archive: kindle


Amazon’s Kindle may be one of the most popular digital book readers out there, but the Sony Reader and applications made for the Ipod and Iphone are close behind. In fact Sony recently struck a deal with Google in hopes of increasing sales as well as popularity. According to an article by the NY Times by the end of the week, Sony hopes to include roughly “a half million copyright-free books available for its Reader device.” By doing this, Sony is attempting to divert attention from the Kindle as well as invite new digital readers to its Reading device as oppose to Kindle or similar devices/applications.

This will certainly be a difficult task for Sony. Amazon currently has 250,000 books that are available for the Kindle (and that number continues to grow). Furthermore, titles that are available for the Kindle are “books people are most interested in reading, like new releases and best sellers.” Whereas Sony’s Reader, with the help of Google, will allow individuals to download free non-copyrighted material. The reason that these titles are non-copyrighted are due mainly to the fact that the books are old- or have been in print long enough to lose the copyright once associated with them. The titles add up to roughly 7 million books that will be available for FREE!

“The books available to Reader owners were written before 1923 and include classics like “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court,” by Mark Twain, and “The Awakening,” by Kate Chopin, as well as harder-to-find titles like “The Letters of Jane Austen.””

If you happen to like reading classics, then this will be great. However you won’t find any titles by Editorial Campana or Campanita books.  Google is working to increase the copyright-free materials. In the meantime, through the Google Book Search Program, books that are copyrighted will be visible only with either selected pages/text or only the first few pages. 

Once Google and Sony team up, will readers turn their attention to the Reader for classics (and maybe one day new releases/bestsellers)? Or will Kindle’s emphasis to provide new books and hot releases over-power Google and Amazon. Maybe in the end- neither will progress- applications made for computers and mobile devices may turn out to be what’s on the next page!

Advertisements

As you all know by now, Kindle, the famous revolutionary reading device from from Amazon, has had a make-over. Amazon is happy to announce the Kindle 2. Although still the same price of 359, the Kindle 2 offers a bunch of new features. If you read our blog, “Reading on the go,” or anywhere else on the web, you already know about the new features. We won’t get too in depth on them.

The one feature that stands out that amazon is hyping up is called WHISPERSYNC. This feature allows “readers to begin a book on one Kindle and continue, at the same point in the text, on another Kindle or a mobile phone.” Amazon hopes that this will make consumers more attracted to Kindle than other reading devices on the market. In short, Amazon is trying to make the KIndle the standard in digital reading devices. What the iPod did for music, Kindle hopes to do for books.

picture-1How will the Kindle 2 hold up? This seems a risky step for Amazon with the condition of the economy and the fact that there are many cheaper reading devices currently on the market. However, with cheaper prices for e-books, Amazon hopes to increase sales in the digital book realm. Since traditional book sales have dropped, digital books have started to show higher sales in the last year and are increasing at a steady (and possibly alarming) rate.

Amazon generally charges $9.99 for the digital versions of best sellers, although many publishers still sell the digital content to Amazon for the same price that they sell physical books. That means that for now, Amazon is taking a loss or making a small margin on the sale of some e-books.

Depending on how you look at it, Kindle is either good or bad. You may be able to get a copy of Editorial Campana’s book at a cheaper rate by buying the Kindle edition, but at what cost?

For those of you who have a Kindle (older version and Kindle 2), how has the device changed your reading habits- if at all?

Related article from the NY Times.

We have written several blogs about the popular Kindle from Amazon and how it could potentially replace traditional books (as well as similar devices). We here at Editorial Campana, being a book publishing company and all, try to keep up with the latest literary technology and news. Recently we stumbled across a new program that may have Kindle beat. And it’s not the only one. This new program/device/technology is called eReader. It is part of the iPhone’s application store (it is also available for many other portable devices and computers). So how does it work?

Like Kindle, you go to the eReader website and search for a book that you would like to add to your iPhone. Once you do this, you can download the book (after buying it) and then add it to your “bookshelf.” You can do this all wirelessly or you can add the book to your computer to have a much larger screen. Kindle has a similar feature that allows you to upload a book wirelessly, but here’s the catch- you have to buy Kindle for $359! The iPhone and other cell phones are much cheaper. The application is free unless you buy the pro. Looks like eReader has you beat here Kindle.

picture-11This application for your iPhone comes with a lot of great features. You can go to any page very easily and save your progress in case you need to come back to your book later. The settings section allows you to change the font size and style, change the way the pages turn (to give it amore realistic feeling), and change the screen color (black/white or reverse). And just like with the iPhone you can change from portrait to landscape depending on what you like better.

Sounds like this free application does it all. It has a very easy user interface and if you go to the website, they say they are always working on updates to make the application even better. Probably the best feature is that since this is a wireless device, it works on the 3G network or any Wi-Fi network so that you can always access your bookshelf. The only downside may be getting the books. With the computer you just go to eReader.com and purchase the book that you want. After you have bought it you can use the iPhone to update your bookshelf with your new content. We haven’t figured out how to do this on the iPhone yet (aside from the quick link to the eReader site), so we are not so sure that you can do that. As long as you have access to a computer though, your bookshelf is your mobile library. The application also works with Fictionwise and manybooks.net. There is the ability to import books from other sites, but the featured ones are easy and convienent. 

Another downside that we found was that the books were pricey for digital content as oppose to Kindle editions. For example the new Dean Koontz book, “The Good Guy,” cost about $5 for the Kindle edition whereas the eReader edition cost about regular price (about $8). The eReader does provide a program that allows you to get a discount of 15%. This program is known as the eReader Rewards program. So although the books may cost more, if you are an avid book reader, earning points will be quick and you will se significant discounts shortly thereafter. 

As more people are turning towards digital books, it looks like there are many more options now than just Kindle and the Sony device. We think it’s great that the iPhone has this application because aside from having to shell out more money and carry another device, the features are great and you will always have it with. Did we mention that the iPhone is much smaller than the Kindle?

Here is the tv ad that showed the world that the iPhone was launching into the digital reading device realm:

As the economy has taken a downward spiral, what impact has it had on book sales? The economy, as we all know, as bad. Many experts say that it will get worse before it gets better and many agree that it will be a while before change for the better occurs. Since the decline of the economy, prices have dropped, gas has gone down, and everyone is wondering what will happen next. When “Black Friday” came around, consumer found deals that made their eyes pop out.  Despite the downfall of the economy, people are still shopping.

Net sales of books in April fell 3.5 percent to $472.7 million, based on data from 79 publishers as reported to the Association of American Publishers.

We probably should have expected this as many other products have been on the decline since the economic crisis. surprising though is that digital-based copies of books have not declined. sales in April rose almost 20%. This may be due to the fact that Kindle has increased in popularity. It may also be due to the fact that people are looking to spend their money in the best way possible- treading away from traditional media and venturing into the digital realm. Maybe there is some sense in buying the digital copy of Sonia Rivera-Valdès’ Stories of Little Women and Grown-Up Girls

Due to the decrease in book sales, many bookstores may start to sell books at lower prices to try and attract customers. Since the stores and retailers usually buy books at a fraction of the price for what they sell them, it may be in their best interest to slash prices if they are to stay in business, especially if the economy continues its trend.

“Most bookstores buy stock for 20 to 40 percent off suggested retail,” May said. “But they can buy remainders and other bargain books for as much as 90 percent off retail price. That means they can sell the books for less in a time when consumers are spending fewer dollars on books, and still make a higher profit margin.

As we get closer and closer to the end of 2008 and move into 2009, we can only hope that book sales will increase. Even if digital book sales continue to increase, traditional books also need to make a comeback. Hopefully, by slashing prices books will become more and more attractive, even in this digitally run world.

Read the full article quoted: Book sales in decline as U.S. economy contracts

Revisiting one of our posts dated April 14, 2008, we talked about our books going digital and a new device known as “the Kindle.” Since then we’ve wondered how popular this cousin to the iPod would do? Some stated that they would continue to read traditional books, while others noted that this device was more practical and space saving. So what has become of the Kindle?

An article posted on June 2nd discussed how an electronic device (a.k.a kindle) had stirred some questions at a recent book fair. Although it was a BOOK fair, Kindle got most of the attention:

Electronic/digital books have been around since 1968. They became popular when authors such as Stephen King started to dive into this area (with his book Riding the Bullet). So why now are publishers and bookstores concerned about books being turned into digital format? “Much of the expected growth in electronic books can be tied to the Kindle.” Furthermore, publishers are saying that they are seeing a dramatic increase in sales from digital books- many publishers have now doubled their digital selection and sales (in total) are reaching past $1 million. 

As Kindle increases to grow in popularity (and similar devices such as Sony’s Reader Digital Book so will digital books. Although it may take a while before digital books become the norm, it seems safe to say that we are getting a glimpse of the future. Digital seems to be the new standard. Is this good or bad? 

Editorial Campana has several titles that are in Kindle format– seeing as this new technology will one day revolutionize the literary world, getting a head start seems like a good idea.

Full Article

Author’s and publisher’s are finding it easier to get noticed thanks to the Internet. In fact many online services allow free publishing (such as createspace.com) and many authors have their books available online for free (such as The Online Book Page). Many say they employ these tactics for greater publicity. Another reason that the internet has become such a useful tool for literature and print media is because money talks- online literature, magazines, newspapers, etc., are less expensive for both the consumer and the producer.

A good example in the literary realm is the release of Amazon’s revolutionary reading device: Kindle.If you haven’t heard about this device, it’s simply an iPod for books. Owners can download full books onto this device (up to about 200 books) and take read them anywhere. And thanks to its internet capability, you don’t need a computer to buy the kindle editions of books. The device also has a nice easy reading display, unlike many laptops. iPods do have audio books and similar devices allow you to download books onto them, but limited space and poor displays makes the Kindle more favorable.

Many, including Editorial Campana’s Weblog have discussed if the Kindle is worth it or not. Many people still argue that traditional books is what they prefer. So it would seem that for now, books are safe from the digital revolution. Or to put it in better terms, they are endangered but not extinct.

So what about other print media, such as magazines and newspapers.We still love to go to the mail book and get our new editions, many still enjoy grabbing their cup of coffee and a newspaper, and when it comes to traveling, it’s always fun to travel with plenty of reading material. But is all this about to change. According to a recent article from (and yes its off the Internet) The New York times, physical magazines and newspapers may soon become a thing of the past.  In fact, some magazines that were available in both forms have opted out of traditional print and are now only published via digital format.

“Just last week, The Capital Times, a 90-year-old daily newspaper in Madison, Wis., ended its print version and began publishing only online.”

With the way the economy is a the moment, cheaper is better and it helps to reach a greater audience. The numbers seem to be doing the talking. Many companies have noted that they have seem more readers from their online publications. As well money talks- companies have seen higher (even just slightly) profits from online publications. Due to this, when it comes to the future, many companies are adopting what is known as an “online first” approach to business. While in the past, companies split their efforts between online and traditional publications, lately, the former is getting more attention and becoming more of the norm.

What does this all mean? Although we can still go to the store and buy our books, magazines, newspapers, etc., will we one day go to a computer and download digital versions that we will carry like we once did with our physical literature? How will this affect Kindle’s popularity and the overall world of literature?

Editorial Campana has recently made seven of their books available for digital download through Amazon.com making the books accessible to Kindle users. Three out of four of these titles comprise of separate English and Spanish versions. Selections available include the captivating So I Won’t Forget (English)/ Para que no se me olvide(Spanish) by Paquita Suarez Coalla, Stories of Little Women and Grown-Up Girls(English)/Historias de mujeres grandes y chiquitas(Spanish) by Casa de Las Américas literary prize winning author Sonia Rivera-Valdes, the heart wrenching Memory Tracks(English)/Fragmentos de la memoria (Spanish) by Margarita Drago and the reflective Escenas para turistas by Revolución y Cultura Magazine’s Fiction Award winner, Jaqueline Herranz Brooks. While many of the digital books offered to Kindle users cost around $9.99, you can find Editorial Campana’s titles for an affordable $3.96 per book.

 The Kindle, for those who are not familiar with it, is a portable and wireless reading device that enables users to download digital versions of full-length books, magazines, and newspapers through Amazon’s wireless Whispernet network. The Kindle can be purchased from Amazon.com for $399.00 and holds up to approximately 200 titles. Currently, there are more than 100,000 books available in the Kindle library, including more than 90 of 112 current New York Times® Best Sellers.

All of Editorial Campana’s titles can also now be previewed before you buy them. Amazon’s “Search Inside” feature allows visitors to browse real sample pages of the books before deciding to purchase them. “Search Inside” is a handy feature whether you prefer downloading a digital book with your new Kindle, or simply looking for a good old paperback or hardcover.

What does everything think about the Kindle? I personally prefer the traditional physical book in my hand (especially small paperbacks because I can put fold them up and put them in my pocket), though I haven’t gotten the chance to see a Kindle in person yet. The computer screen is supposed to be easy on the eyes, mimicking a real paper page. You can also store a ton of books into this device making it a real space saver. Is the Kindle the IPod of for books? Any thoughts??

Will